Secret beaches in Sydney

From beautiful Sydney Harbour to Australia’s oldest national park, you’ll find hidden gems with amazing views and soft sands perfect for relaxing and picnicking. You can reach many of Sydney’s secret beaches on walking trails. Scenic ferry trips will also take you close to some secluded beaches.

The charming Lady Martins Beach is nestled among Australia’s most expensive harbourside homes in Point Piper, between Double Bay and Rose Bay in Sydney’s east. A lane off Wolseley Road leads to the pretty beach, named after the wife of Sir James Martin, a colonial NSW premier and chief justice.

Other gorgeous hidden beaches in Sydney include:

Milk Beach, Vaucluse

There are delightful walks to Sydney’s well-kept secrets. The Hermitage Foreshore track begins in Nielsen Park, Vaucluse and winds past the heritage-listed Strickland House to Milk Beach, a small sandy oasis. The trail offers spectacular vistas of Shark Island and the iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge.

Store Beach is only accessible by boat. You can hire kayaks from the Manly Kayak Centre and paddle to the beach on North Head. Another serene location is Collins Flat Beach, a treasure tucked away between Little Manly Cove and North Head. The walk from Manly Wharf is less than 20 minutes.

Another serene location is Collins Flat Beach, a treasure tucked away between Little Manly Cove and North Head and less than 20 minutes’ walk from Manly Wharf. Or hire a bicycle from Manly Bike Tours and pedal to Collins Flat, near North Head where there are stunning ocean and harbour views.

In southern Sydney is Congwong Beach, a quiet little paradise on the La Perouse-side of Kamay Botany Bay National Park. Or take a ferry from Cronulla to enchanting Bundeena and walk to Jibbon Beach. On Jibbon Head in the Royal National Park, you can see ancient Aboriginal rock engravings.

Sydney Beach safety

ENJOY SYDNEY'S BEACHES BY FOLLOWING THESE SAFETY TIPS

Always swim between the red and yellow flags; surf lifesavers have identified this area as the safest spot to swim in the water. It's also a good idea to always swim with a friend.

Pay attention to the advice of the lifesavers and safety signs. Visit SharkSmart to understand any potential risks in the area you are swimming. You are always welcome to ask lifeguards for more safety advice. If you find yourself needing help in the water, stay calm and attract attention.

Check conditions before you go. You can also find patrolled beach by visiting beachsafe.org.au.

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