Parliament House

Overview

Parliament House is where Australia’s first parliament would meet for political and governing purposes. Within its existing network of buildings that stands in Macquarie Street – where the Parliament…

Parliament House is where Australia’s first parliament would meet for political and governing purposes. Within its existing network of buildings that stands in Macquarie Street – where the Parliament of NSW still meets – is the oldest surviving building in the Sydney CBD. 

The historic buildings date back to the days of Governor Lachlan Macquarie (Governor of NSW from 1810-1821). When he arrived in the colony, he discovered there were no permanent hospital facilities. With no funds from the British Government, he managed to oversee the development of Sydney's first permanent hospital in 1816. To fund its construction, he allowed contractors to import and sell 60,000 gallons of rum. As a result, the hospital became known as the Rum Hospital. Two of the Rum Hospital's original buildings survive today – the southern wing which was The Mint building, and the northern wing, now part of the Parliament of NSW.

The Legislature has occupied the building from 1829. In the mid-1970s, a major rebuilding and restoration program began, creating the present mix of heritage and modern buildings.

On select days, take the 1hr guided tour through the Legislative Chambers and view the historic Parkes, Wentworth and Jubilee rooms. Observe the colonial architecture while learning more about the role, history and work of the NSW Parliament. On site, you can dine at the café or restaurant.

Access and Inclusion Statement

Actively welcomes people with access needs.

Caters for people who are deaf or have hearing loss

Caters for people who use a wheelchair.

Have a hearing loop
Have an accessible public toilet which is unlocked

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